Majesty of Glacier National Park Coming to Postcards

Created from ancient upheavals and the artistic whittling of glaciers, Glacier National Park‘s magnificent peaks and valleys are revered by local Native American tribes and are an awe-inspiring experience for visitors. Glacier was established as a national park on May 11, 1910.

Named for the glaciers that sculpted the landscape more than 10,000 years ago and for the Little Ice Age glaciers there today, Glacier National Park preserves more than a million acres of rugged peaks, panoramic valleys, flowering alpine meadows, sparkling rivers, spectacular lakes, and great wooded forests in the Northern Rocky Mountains.

The park’s Triple Divide Peak straddles the Continental Divide. From this location, the water that falls west flows to the Pacific Ocean, while the water that falls northeast and southeast flows to the Hudson Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Ranges in elevation and the variable climatic conditions created by the park’s location yield a patchwork of habitats enjoyed by biologically diverse plant and bird communities.

More than 1,800 species of plants have been identified in the park to date. The park is a haven for wildlife with 277 species of birds and 67 species of mammals, including bald eagle, wolverine, lynx, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, and wolf. The park is also home to one of the largest remaining grizzly bear populations in the lower 48 states.

The remarkable Going-to-the-Sun Road, a renowned engineering marvel that officially opened in 1933, winds 50 miles through the heart of the park and across the mountains. The road provides breathtaking views of the landscape and access to the grandeur of Glacier’s early 1900s Swiss-style lodges, several campgrounds, and the many places reminiscent of the park’s rich cultural history of Native Americans, explorers, trappers, miners, and settlers that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

More than 730 miles of trails and hundreds of lakes and streams afford close to two million recreational visitors a year excellent opportunities for hiking, fishing, and boating.

In 1932, Canada and the United States declared Glacier National Park and neighboring Waterton Lakes National Park the world’s first international peace park. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) designated both parks biosphere reserves in the 1970s and recognized them together as a World Heritage site in 1995.

This majestic stamp image of Montana’s Glacier National Park is one of 10 designs featured on the upcoming set of Scenic American Landscapes stamp cards. Scheduled for release on June 23, these beautiful postcards are the second set highlighting some of our nation’s most beautiful natural places.

Getting Outside for National Park Week

Today kicks off National Park Week and we can’t wait to get outside and enjoy it! Through April 29, the National Park Service and National Park Foundation encourage us all to take advantage of our natural world by visiting any of the 397 national parks for free!

This international rate stamp issued earlier this year celebrates Montana’s Glacier National Park. Often described as one of the most stunning national parks in the U.S., Glacier was established on May 11, 1910.

The stamp image shows Logan Pass, the highest point on the park’s spectacular Going-to-the-Sun Road. Peaks of the Northern Rocky Mountains fill the photo’s background. In the foreground, melting snowbanks reveal a lush meadow dusted with wildflowers.

Named for the glaciers that sculpted the landscape more than 10,000 years ago and for the Little Ice Age glaciers there today, Glacier National Park preserves more than a million acres of rugged peaks and valleys, alpine meadows, spectacular lakes, and dense forest. The park is a haven for wildlife with 277 species of birds and 67 species of mammals including bald eagle, wolverine, lynx, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, and wolf.

In 1932, Canada and the United States declared Glacier National Park and neighboring Waterton Lakes National Park the world’s first international peace park. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) designated both parks biosphere reserves in the 1970s and recognized them together as a World Heritage site in 1995.

To celebrate National Park Week, we’ll be holding a daily contest here on the blog centered around our love of national parks. Each day’s single winner will receive a set of the Scenic American Landscapes stamped cards, which showcase photographs from parks across the country.

To enter the contest for today, simply answer the following two-part question:

What was the first national park and when was it established?

Submit your answer to uspsstamps [at] gmail [dot] com and remember, spelling counts! The winner will be selected at random and notified by email. Deadline for entries is 12 p.m. EST on Sunday, April 22. Good luck!

Glacier National Park Stamp Issued Today

The latest stamp in the Scenic American Landscapes series features a photograph of majestic Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana by Michael Melford. Looking toward the Northern Rocky Mountains, this view of glacier lilies blooming along the Continental Divide was taken at Logan Pass. Created from ancient upheavals and the artistic whittling of glaciers, the park’s magnificent peaks and valleys are revered by local Native American tribes and are an awe-inspiring experience for visitors. Glacier was established as a national park on May 11, 1910.

Named for the glaciers that sculpted the landscape more than 10,000 years ago and for the Little Ice Age glaciers there today, Glacier National Park preserves more than a million acres of rugged peaks, panoramic valleys, flowering alpine meadows, sparkling rivers, spectacular lakes, and great wooded forests in the Northern Rocky Mountains.

The park’s Triple Divide Peak straddles the Continental Divide. From this location, the water that falls west flows to the Pacific Ocean, while the water that falls northeast and southeast flows to the Hudson Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Ranges in elevation and the variable climatic conditions created by the park’s location yield a patchwork of habitats enjoyed by biologically diverse plant and bird communities.

More than 1,800 species of plants have been identified in the park to date. The park is a haven for wildlife with 277 species of birds and 67 species of mammals, including bald eagle, wolverine, lynx, mountain goat, bighorn sheep, and wolf. The park is also home to one of the largest remaining grizzly bear populations in the lower 48 states.

The remarkable Going-to-the-Sun Road, a renowned engineering marvel that officially opened in 1933, winds 50 miles through the heart of the park and across the mountains. The road provides breathtaking views of the landscape and access to the grandeur of Glacier’s early 1900s Swiss-style lodges, several campgrounds, and the many places reminiscent of the park’s rich cultural history of Native Americans, explorers, trappers, miners, and settlers that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

More than 730 miles of trails and hundreds of lakes and streams afford close to two million recreational visitors a year excellent opportunities for hiking, fishing, and boating.

In 1932, Canada and the United States declared Glacier National Park and neighboring Waterton Lakes National Park the world’s first international peace park. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) designated both parks biosphere reserves in the 1970s and recognized them together as a World Heritage site in 1995.

The 85-cent Glacier National Park, Montana, stamp is being issued in self-adhesive sheets of 20 stamp at a price of $17.00 per sheet. This is the First-Class Mail one-ounce rate for mail to Mexico and Canada. The stamp is also available in blocks of 4 ($3.40) or 10 ($8.50) stamps. Collectors unable to attend today’s First Day of Issue Ceremony can also purchase the First Day Cover.